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Social Studies

AP United States History

 

PURPOSE: This AP U.S. History course includes the study of political institutions, social and
cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus on relevant
themes and topics. It is designed to be a challenging college survey course which prepares
students to successfully pass the AP exam and earn college credit. Planned to help students
improve their reading, writing, critical thinking, research, discussion, debate and presentation
skills, this course prepares students for the challenge and rigor of university course work.
Successful completion of AP U.S. History fulfills the state and district graduation requirements,
and it prepares students to succeed on the state mandated end-of-instruction test for U.S. History.

 

THEMES: Major themes are woven throughout this course study of political institutions, social
and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History and are emphasized
through all types of instruction. Focus on these broad concepts about America’s past enables
students to see both change and continuity over time. These themes include:

a. the evolution of a unique American identity
b. American diversity and the relationships among different groups
c. the development of American culture
d. religion and its influence on American society
e. slavery and its legacies
f. demographic changes
g. economic trends and transformations
h. the impact of Americans on the environment
i. the development of political institutions and components of citizenship
j. social reform movements
k. war and diplomacy
l. the role of the United States in a global society

POWERPOINT LECTURE/DISCUSSION: The PowerPoint presentations include many
images (pictures, political cartoons, photographs, charts, graphs, maps, short video clips, artwork
and music of the time period) which students are asked to interpret and analyze. The PowerPoint
lecture/discussions help students synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical
information and comprehend chronology, enhancing their understanding of America’s history
and the many changes that have occurred over time. They are shown with an LCD on a large 10’
by 10’ screen.

 

GRADED DISCUSSIONS: Graded discussions encourage students to analyze and interpret a
wide variety of relevant historical information and ideology through both written and oral
expression. The three types utilized include:

1. Students must research a particular theme or topic and write insightful questions to ask
their peers. They must also be prepared to answer others’ questions during the inner/outer
circle discussion.
2. Students must investigate a significant historical figure in order to portray that figure’s
point of view during the role play/round table discussion.
3. Students must examine historians’ interpretations, analyzing their evidence and points of
view, to be prepared to take a stand during the discussion/debate.


 

COOPERATIVE LEARNING GROUPS: Cooperative learning groups (3-4 students) will be
frequently utilized in solving problems and producing products. Most of these activities result in
oral presentations and large group discussions.

 

WRITINGS: Students regularly create document analysis writings using APPARTS and
SOAPS. Students frequently write analytical and interpretive essays (FRQ-Free-Response Essay
Question) and (DBQ-Document-Based Essay Question). Significant time is spent learning the
process of writing a strong, positional essay (step-by-step procedures include practicing thesis
statement writing, making organizational charts, analyzing documents and making inferences,
connecting the documents to outside supporting evidence, and then putting it all together to
create an argument or stand in a well written essay). Graded FRQ’s and DBQ’s using the 9 point
AP U.S. History scale are returned and analyzed; samples of well-done essays are shared so that
students are clearly aware of what constitutes a superior essay.

 

PRIMARY SOURCES: Students analyze and interpret a variety of primary sources including
but not limited to: documents, books, articles, maps, tables, graphs, artworks, period music,
poetry, political cartoons, and photographs. Students use the APPARTS process to analyze
many primary source readings. Students must analyze the document by writing the Author, Place
and time, Prior knowledge, Audience, Reason, Theme and Significance. Students also use the
SOAPS process to analyze and interpret many primary sources, noting the Source, Occasion,
Audience, Purpose and Subject.

 

TABLES, GRAPHS, MAPS, SECONDARY SOURCES: Students analyze, interpret, and
create tables, graphs, and maps to enhance their knowledge of the themes and relevant factual
content of U.S. History; many focus on demographic changes, economic trends, and change over
time. A wide collection of books, encyclopedias, document collections, journals, and other
sources are available for student examination in the classroom and the school library. Students
are issued both textbooks listed below. Class sets of both volumes of Discovering the American
Past and The American Spirit are available during class and for check-out. Three computers with
internet access are available to students in the classroom and two computer labs are also
available in the building.

 

HISTORIOGRAPHY: Students analyze, compare, evaluate and discuss viewpoints from noted
historians throughout the course.

 

EXAMS: Multiple choice questions are selected from the released AP U.S. History exams and
the test banks of The American Pageant and The Enduring Vision. All questions have five
responses. Each unit exam ranges from 75-100 questions.

 

TEXTBOOKS AND ADDITIONAL READERS: Students read The American Pageant as
their primary textbook, however each student also receives The Enduring Vision as a
supplementary source. Readers are available for use during the class each day or for check-out,
and many handouts of primary and secondary sources are provided.

Primary textbook:

Kennedy, David M, Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas Bailey. The American Pageant: A


History of the Republic. 13th ed. Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2006.

Secondary textbook:

Boyer, Paul S. et al. The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People. 3rd ed.

Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath, 1996.

Additional readers, books, etc.:

Binder, Frederick M., and David M. Reimers. The Way We Lived: Essays and Documents in

American Social History, Vols. I and II. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Company,

1996.

Davis, Allen, and Harold Woodman. Conflict & Consensus in American History, Vols. I and

II. 9th ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.

Hersey, John. Hiroshima. New York: Random House, 1989 (1946).

Kennedy, David M., and Thomas A. Bailey. The American Spirit, Vols. I and II. 11th ed. Boston:

Houghton Mifflin Co., 2006.

Leach, Roberta J., and Augustine Caliguire. Advanced Placement U.S. History, Vols. 1 and 2.

United States: Center for Learning, 1997.

Marcus, Robert D., and David Burner. America Firsthand, Vols. I and II. 4th ed. Boston:

Bedford Books, 1997.

Monk, Linda R., ed. Ordinary Americans. Alexandria, Va.: Close Up Publishing, 1994.

Wheeler, William Bruce, and Susan D. Becker. Discovering the American Past: A Look at the

Evidence, Vols. I and II. 4th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1998.

 

EXAMPLES OF INTERNET SITES/LINKS UTILIZED:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html Library of Congress American Memory

http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives

http://www.econedlink.org/ Source of Economic History and Lessons

http://www.si.edu/ Smithsonian - Art, History, Culture

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/ Maps

http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/ Documents in Law, History, and Diplomacy

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/ Primary Source Eyewitness Accounts

http://historymatters.gmu.edu/ U.S. History web resources

http://www.metmuseum.org/ The Metropolitan Museum of Art

http://www.state.gov/www/about_state/history/frus.html The U.S. State Department

 

UNIT ONE: The First Americans and European Settlement

 

Textbook readings:

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 1-3

The American Pageant, Chapter 1

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Bartolome de Las Casas Defends the Indians 1552 (The American Spirit, Vol. I, pp. 4-6)
b. The Mayflower Compact
c. Discourse Concerning the Western Planting by Richard Hakluyt (The American Spirit,
Vol. I, pp. 29-30)


Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

Pre-Colombian societies (empires and culture), Transatlantic encounters, cultural
differences between Americans and Europeans, Native American resistance, Columbian
Exchange and its effects, motives and methods of colonization (Spanish, French and
English), role of religion, rise of mercantilism, Virginia and Massachusetts Bay Colonies

 

Activities:

The first unit includes student directed exploration of the first three chapters of The Enduring
Vision and a packet of primary and secondary source documents through a summer assignment.
A short time is spent debriefing the student responses, including but not limited to:

1. One page essay on the effects of the Colombian Exchange based on text readings, Jose
Juan Arrom’s Forerunners of a New Mestizo Population (Historiography: Ordinary
Americans, pp. 3-4), Bartolome de Las Casas Defends the Indians, 1552(The American
Spirit, Vol. I, pp. 4-6) and four Aztec artistic works recording the encounter between
Cortes and Montezuma (Discovering the American Past, Vol. 1, pp. 22-24).
2. Document analysis of The Mayflower Compact using APPARTS.
3. Compare/contrast essay on the ideology and settlement of the Pilgrims and Puritans.
4. Venn diagram comparing primary source ship rosters of 1635 (one ship heading to
Massachusetts, the other heading to Virginia) and inferences from the diagram.
5. One page analysis of the cultural and economic responses of the Spanish, French, and
British to the Native Americans of North America, noting similarities and differences.

Assessments:

3 summer take-home quizzes over content and themes of the unit

 

UNIT TWO: The Building of Colonial America and Colonial Society

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 2-5

The Enduring Vision, Chapter 4

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. There is Nothing to Be Gotten Here but Sickness and Death by Richard Frethorne (letter
to parents in Ordinary Americans, pp. 6-8)

b. A Model of Christian Charity by John Winthrop
c. Poor Richard’s Almanac by Ben Franklin
d. Deprived of All Chance of Returning to My Native Country by Olaudah Equiano
(Ordinary Americans, pp. 8-10)

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:


settlement of the13 English colonies and development of regional differences, Native
American resistance, role of religion on colonization, Puritan demise and legacy, push-
pull factors for population growth and immigration, indentured servitude and Bacon’s
Rebellion, development of plantation economy and slavery, Transatlantic economy and
trade, colonial government and imperial policy, the Enlightenment and Great Awakening,
the emergence of a distinct American culture with unique folkways, development of
colonial society and class structure

 

Activities:

1. Cooperative learning groups (3- 4 students) create two charts about the 13 English
colonies. Chart 1 includes development of each of the 13 colonies, including motivation
for founding, financing and type (joint stock, proprietary, royal), leadership, and
chronology. Chart 2 is based on PERSIA -Political (degree of self-government),
Economic base and labor, Religious influence and legal protection, Social opportunities
for mobility, Intellectual (educational opportunities), and Artistic (regional music or art),
characteristics of the three sections: New England, middle and plantation colonies.
Students share findings and then write a conclusion noting major differences and
similarities and why they existed and answering the question “The Three Colonial
Sections – One Society or Three?” Creative aspect includes a “flyer” advertisement of
one of the colonies; the flyer’s assessment is based on presentation and persuasion.
2. Document analysis of There is Nothing to Be Gotten Here but Sickness and Death by
Richard Frethorne (Ordinary Americans, pp.6-8) using SOAPS.
3. Students view short documentary on Salem Witchcraft, then analyze why this happened
and the ramifications in a large group discussion.
4. Poor Richards Almanac – students interpret eight of Franklin’s proverbs and create one
of their own relating to present day American culture.
5. DBQ: To what extent had the colonists developed a sense of their identity and unity as
Americans by the eve of the Revolution (1740-1776). This first DBQ of the course is
done in an in-class process format that includes analyzing documents and making
inferences, brainstorming and charting outside evidence and connecting documents to
that evidence, categorizing, and creating a thesis statement and essay outline – then
students write the DBQ as a take-home assignment.

Assessments:

Unit Multiple Choice Exam

 

UNIT THREE: Imperial Wars and the American Revolution

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 6-8

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 5, 6 (pp. 162-182)

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


b. Remember the Ladies Letters from Abigail Adams to John Adams (The Way We Lived,
Vol. I, pp, 135-136)
c. Common Sense by Thomas Paine
d. The Declaration of Independence

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

Imperial wars in America, the French and Indian War, mercantilism and British policy
changes, the American resistance to Britain’s response, the American Revolution and its
course, the decision for independence, the Treaty of Paris

 

Activities:

1. Label maps of North America, in 1754 and in 1763; contrast the two maps in a paragraph.
2. PowerPoint lecture/discussion with pictures, paintings, maps, short video clips, political
cartoons, and period music that provides relevant factual knowledge, helping students
analyze and interpret the causes, events and effects of the American Revolution.
3. SOAPS analysis of The Boston Massacre (3 pictorial versions including Revere’s
engraving) and a compare/contrast one-page paper citing reasons for the discrepancies,
focusing on the significance of propaganda.
4. Charts created by cooperative learning groups citing British actions and rationales and
American reactions and rationales to British policy changes leading to the American
Revolution (Proclamation of 1763, Sugar Act, Currency Act, Stamp Act, Repeal of
Stamp Act, Declaratory Act, Townshend Act, Tea Act, Quartering Act, Coercive Acts).
Students share and discuss information and conclusions. Culminating discussion
questions: “What would you have done if you were in charge of British policy over the
colonies?” “Was the dominant concern of colonists economic or political?” “Could war
have been avoided?” (Adapted from Center for Learning AP US History 1, Lesson 7)
5. Analysis/Interpretation of the painting: Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel
Leutze using the website http://www.metmuseum.org/.
6. Charts created by cooperative learning groups describing and ranking the reasons why the
Americans were able to defeat Great Britain. Graded discussion/debate concludes with
group essay outline of an FRQ: Assess why the underdog Americans were able to defeat
Great Britain, the most powerful nation in the world.
7. Evening movie (all evening movies are optional): The Last of the Mohicans or The
Patriot.

Assessments:

1. DBQ: In what ways did the French and Indian War (1754-63) alter the political,
economic, and ideological relations between Britain and its American colonies? (time
period 1740-1766)
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT FOUR: Establishing a Republic

 

Textbook Readings:


The American Pageant, Chapters 9-12

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 6 (pp. 183-194), 7-8

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Articles of Confederation
b. Federalist Paper # 10 by James Madison
c. The Constitution
d. The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
e. Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
f. The Spirit of the Laws by Baron de Montesquieu
g. The Treatises on Civil Government by John Locke
h. Washington’s Farewell Address
i. Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address
j. Her Baby Strapped to Her Back by Finn Burnett (Ordinary Americans, pp. 43-45)
k. The Monroe Doctrine

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

changing political sentiments and their effects on new state constitutions and national
government; failures and successes of the Articles of Confederation; the Constitution, its
ratification, and the Bill of Rights; Washington sets political precedents; Hamilton’s
economic policies and debate; emergence of political parties; republican motherhood;
national power versus states’ rights (Alien/Sedition Acts and nullification); Jeffersonian
Revolution; expansion into the trans-Appalachian West and Native American resistance;
the Louisiana Purchase; economic and diplomatic troubles leading to the War of 1812;
conduct and consequences of the War of 1812; nationalism and diplomatic achievements
of the Era of Good Feelings; Missouri Compromise (sectionalism); Marshall Court
rulings and precedents; Monroe Doctrine

 

Activities:

1. Cooperative learning groups (3- 4 students) create two charts about the Articles of
Confederation. Chart 1 is organized by economic, political and diplomatic troubles. Chart
2 outlines the specific “fixes” of the Constitution in respect to problems of the Articles of
Confederation, particularly in the areas of economic, political, and foreign policy, citing
expressed powers of the Constitution.
2. Song Review: Ode (or Goodbye and Good Riddance) to the Articles of Confederation, to
the tune of Queen’s We Will Rock You, helping students retain relevant factual
information about the problems of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitutional
repairs.
3. Document analysis of excerpts from the works of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and
Montesquieu using APPARTS, tracing the European philosophical roots to the U.S
Constitution.
4. Historiography: students write outline notes focusing on historians’ (Charles Beard,
Samuel Morrison and Henry Commager) contrasting interpretations of the motives


(economic or political) of the Founding Fathers in the creation of the Constitution –
graded discussion/debate follows.
5. PowerPoint lecture/discussion with pictures, paintings, maps, charts, graphs, short video
clips, political cartoons, and period music that provides relevant factual knowledge,
helping students analyze and interpret the creation of a federal republic under the
Constitution, Washington through Jefferson.
6. Role Play/Debate: Students work in pairs to create arguments supporting or opposing
Hamilton’s economic plans for the new government under the Constitution (paying off
state war debts, full funding of the war bond debt, the whiskey excise tax, a protective
tariff, and forming a national bank) – students role play Hamilton and Jefferson when
presenting arguments to Congress (rest of the students), students vote on each issue as
Congress did and eventually the discussion leads to detection of how the two party
political system of the United States evolved. Students are eventually quizzed over the
characteristics of the Federalists and Democratic Republicans as well as their perception
of why the political parties developed (Adapted from Center for Learning AP US History
1, Lesson 13).
7. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion over causes, events and effects of the War of 1812.
Maps, paintings, pictures, political cartoons, and period music provide relevant factual
knowledge and help students analyze and interpret the economic and diplomatic issues
related to this war.

Assessments:

1. FRQ: Choose one
a. Analyze the degree to which the Articles of Confederation provided an effective
form of government with respect to TWO of the following: foreign relations,
economic conditions, or western lands.
b. To what extent was the election of 1800 aptly named the “Revolution of 1800”?
Respond with reference to TWO of the following areas: economics, foreign
policy, judiciary, or politics.

2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT FIVE: Forging the National Economy, Jacksonian Democracy, and America’s
Reform and Culture

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 13-15

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 9-11

Conflict & Consensus, Vol. 1, pp. 213-231

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Reverend Henry Mills description of the regulations of the Lowell Boardinghouses
(Discovering The American Past, Vol. 1, pp. 16-148)
b. Margaret Bayard Smith’s letter to her son about President Jackson’s inauguration
(Ordinary Americans, pp. 49-50)
c. First and Second Speeches and Replies by Robert Hayne and Daniel Webster


d. One’s-Self I Sing by Walt Whitman
e. Concord Hymn by Ralph Waldo Emerson
f. Annabel Lee by Edgar Allen Poe

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

transportation revolution; creation of a national market economy; beginning of America’s
industrialization; scientific and technological developments; greater divide between
northern and southern economies; Jackson and the Indian Removal Act (and resistance),
tariff and nullification crisis, states’ rights debates, and bank war; Jacksonian Democracy
(successes and limitations); emergence of the 2nd two party political system; Irish and
German immigration and resulting nativism; Texas Revolution; 2nd Great Awakening;
transcendentalism and utopias; social reform movements 1820-1850; American
Renaissance art and literature

 

Activities:

1. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion includes pictures, political cartoons, charts, graphs, maps,
short video clips, artwork and period music which students are asked to interpret and
analyze, helping them synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical information
about the Age of Jackson.
2. Interpretation of a chart and table depicting the change to universal manhood suffrage
during Jacksonian Democracy – noting change over time.
3. Graphs created projecting the change in the tariff policy of the U.S. during its first half
century - discussion relating to the tariff controversy and nullification crisis between
Jackson and South Carolina and the resulting compromise.

4. Historiography: students read Jacksonian Democracy Versus the Business Community by
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. and Consensus and Ideology in the Age of Jackson by Edward
Pessen (Conflict & Consensus, Vol. 1, pp. 213-231) and discuss the differing
interpretations and evaluations of the Age of Jackson.
5. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion with pictures, paintings, literary excerpts, and period
music that provides relevant factual knowledge about American culture, helping students
analyze and interpret the 2nd Great Awakening, the Utopian experiments, the Hudson
River school of art (including artwork by Thomas Cole, Albert Bierstadt, Frederic
Church, Asher Durand, George Caleb Bingham, and George Catlin) transcendentalism
and the American Renaissance, and music by Stephen Collins Foster.
6. Storyboards are created by students in cooperative learning groups using internet and
library research on one (groups draw for topics) of the following antebellum social
reform movements (Education, Women’s Rights, Temperance, Mental Institutions and
Penal Reform, Abolition, and Workers’ Rights). Storyboards must include major goals,
strategies, leadership, successes and failures, primary source pictures and documents.
Project culminates with oral presentations and discussion. This particular activity
prepares students for the unit DBQ.
7. Song Review of Reform Movements – We’ve Got Change in Many Cases to the tune of
Garth Brooks’ I’ve Got Friends in Low Places, helping students retain relevant factual
information about the social developments of this time period in American history.


 

Assessments:

1. DBQ: “Reform movements in the United States sought to expand democratic ideals.”
Assess the validity of this statement with specific reference to the years 1825-1850.
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT SIX: The South and Its Slave Culture and Manifest Destiny

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 16-17

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 12-13

Conflict & Consensus, Vol. I, pp. 350-359

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs (America Firsthand, Vol. 1, 215-
222)
b. Go Down Moses slave spiritual
c. Journal of Narcissa Whitman
d. Abraham Lincoln’s Spot Resolutions

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

expanding economy of the Cotton Kingdom, the growth of the plantation system,
southern social structure, slavery as a social and economic institution, the slave’s life,
expansion and manifest destiny, Texas annexation, Oregon fever, the Mexican War, the
California gold rush

 

Activities:

1. Analysis of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (excerpt) by Harriet Jacobs using
APPARTS.
2. Students listen to, analyze and interpret the slave spiritual Go Down Moses.
3. Graphs created depicting trends in slave ownership, 1650-1850.
4. Historiography: students read and discuss The Northern Response to Slavery by Martin
Duberman (Conflict & Consensus, Vol. I, pp. 350-359).
5. Document Analysis of Narcissa Whitman’s journal excerpt using APPARTS, a woman’s
perspective of the westward pioneer journey.
6. PowerPoint lecture/discussion with pictures, paintings, maps, short video clips, and
political cartoons that provides relevant factual knowledge, helping students analyze and
interpret the causes, events and effects of the Mexican War.
7. Students evaluate American diplomacy by reading a series of primary sources documents,
and then in cooperative learning groups they compile a list of reasons for and against
continental expansion in the 1840’s. A discussion/debate follows in which students
examine the values of decision makers of the era and contrast them with their own values
and biases ((Adapted from Center for Learning AP US History 1, Lesson 20)


8. Chart and map outlining America’s expansion over time, 1776-1853. In the chart,
students fill in date acquired, previous owner, circumstances of acquisition, and then
label the map.

Assessments:

Unit Multiple Choice Exam

 

UNIT SEVEN: Sectional Struggle, Civil War, and Reconstruction

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 18-22

The Enduring Vision, Chapters13-16

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Crime Against Kansas Speech by Charles Sumner
b. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
c. Lincoln’s House Divided Speech
d. Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address
e. Emancipation Proclamation
f. Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address
g. General William T. Sherman’ Special Field Orders, No. 120

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

sectionalism, popular sovereignty, Compromise of 1850, growth of abolition, Kansas-
Nebraska Act and Bleeding Kansas, Brooks-Sumner confrontation, Dred Scott decision,
Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown’s Raid, Election of 1860, secession, the course of
the Civil War (goals, strategies, military battles, civilian and military life during the war;
social, economic and political impact of the war), presidential vs. congressional
Reconstruction plans, Johnson impeachment trial; 1877 Compromise and home rule,
curbs on African American liberties; emergence of Jim Crow laws; Plessy versus
Ferguson; failures and successes of Reconstruction

 

Activities:

1. PhotoStory – a visual and musical interpretation of the causes of the Civil War to the
song, War, What is it Good For, as an introduction to the unit.
2. Students create a portfolio of major causes of sectional strife and compromise including
Compromise of 1850, Kansas Nebraska Act and Bleeding Kansas, the Caning of Senator
Sumner, the Dred Scott decision, development of the Republican Party, the Ostend
Manifesto, the Lincoln/Douglas Debates, the Harper’s Ferry, the presidential election of
1860. Analysis, interpretation of excerpts from primary source laws, political cartoons,
speeches and illustrations as well as secondary source descriptions are utilized.


3. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion with maps, paintings, pictures, political cartoons, graphs,
photographs, short video clips and period music that provides relevant factual knowledge
to help students analyze and interpret the causes and events of the Civil War.
4. Students create graphs using Microsoft Excel in the computer lab, depicting advantages
and disadvantages of the North and South in 1860 (population, railroad mileage, bank
deposits, factories, etc.).
5. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion with maps, paintings, photographs, pictures, political
cartoons, tables, video clips and period music that provides relevant factual knowledge to
help students analyze and interpret the successes and failures of Reconstruction.
6. Reading and discussion of the impeachment and trial of Andrew Johnson, using primary
source trial excerpts.
7. Historiography: How radical was Reconstruction? (The American Pageant, pp. 500-501).
Discussion gives students insight for the unit DBQ.
8. Evening movie: Glory.

Assessments:

1. FRQ: Analyze the moral arguments and political actions of those opposed to the spread
of slavery in the context of TWO of the following: Missouri Compromise, Mexican War,
Compromise of 1850, or the Kansas-Nebraska Act
2. DBQ: In what ways and to what extent did constitutional and social developments
between 1860 and 1877 amount to a revolution?
3. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT EIGHT: Gilded Age: Settling the West, Agricultural Revolution, Politics,
Industrialization, Immigration and Urbanization of America

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 23-26

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 17-21

Conflict & Consensus, Vol. II, pp. 84-99

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Rules for Indian Schools, 1890 (The Way We Live, Vol. II, p. 61-63)
b. A Century of Dishonor by Helen Hunt Jackson
c. One of the Old School Cowboys by James H. Cook (Ordinary Americans, pp.120-122)
d. William Jennings Bryan’s Cross of Gold speech (The American Spirit, Vol. II, pp. 166-
167)

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

conquest of Plains Indians and reservations; the transcontinental railroad; mining and
cattle frontiers; the Great Plains Farmer and rise of Populism; the fading frontier;
corruption and reform in post-war government; economic growth and depressions of
1873 and 1893; tariff policies; the silver issue; entrepreneurs and inventors; industrial


revolution and its social, political and economic impact; captains of industry/robber
barons; laissez-faire government; rise of organized labor and its methods, successes, and
failures; economy of the New South; the New Immigration; resurgence of nativism;
urbanization of America and its social, political and economic impact; Gilded Age
culture

 

Activities:

1. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion includes pictures, political cartoons, charts, graphs, maps,
short video clips, artwork and period music which students are asked to interpret and
analyze, helping them synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical information
about the political, economic, social, cultural, intellectual and artistic development of
America during the Gilded Age.
2. Inner/outer circle discussion over Gilded Age politics.
3. Cooperative learning groups: Students choose topics and create a storyboard representing
each of the following: the Great Plains farmers, the Transcontinental Railroads, the Plains
Indians, Cattlemen and Cowboys, miners, inventors and entrepreneurs, and the Populists.
Students research and must include explanation of “subject”; a timeline describing
how/when subject became important during this time period and then perhaps declined,
listing major events; key leaders with a brief description of how each was significant; any
“federal” laws that may have helped or hindered subject; three interesting facts about
subject; and two pictures-one must be artwork and the other may be printed. Oral
presentations made by each group.
4. Historiography: students read The Robber Barons by Mathew Josephson (Conflict &
Consensus, Vol. II, pp. 84-99) and textbook readings (and any other research they may
want to do) to prepare and conduct a discussion/debate over the Gilded Age Industrialists.
Were they Captains of Industry or Robber Barons?
5. Imitate the new age of advertisement by creating a period advertisement of a new Gilded
Age product.
6. Evening Movie: The Wizard of Oz (students learn about the Littlefield
interpretation/allegory, connecting characters, groups, and events of Baum’s Wonderful
World of Oz to symbols of the Populist Movement and bimetallism (for fun and to help
them retain relevant factual knowledge about Populism).

Assessments:

1. DBQ: How successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers in the
period from 1875 to 1900?
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

 

UNIT NINE: Progressivism

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 28-29

The Enduring Vision, Chapter 22

Conflict and Consensus, Vol. I (pp. 445-457)

 


Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Atlanta Exposition Address by Booker T. Washington (The Way We Lived, Vol. II,
pp. 117-118)
b. A Call for Equality by W.E.B. DuBois (The Way We Lived, Vol. II, pp.118-120)
c. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
d. How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis
e. The Shame of the Cities by Lincoln Steffens
f. Theodore Roosevelt’s Washington speech: The Man with the Muck-Rake (The American
Spirit, Vol. II, pp. 193-194)

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

legacy of populism; political, economic, and social problems of America at turn of the
century; Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois leadership styles and programs for
gaining equality of the races; urban middle class muckrakers and reformers; political
corruption and reform; consumer and environmental protection; poverty and the urban
dilemma; business (trusts) and labor issues; women’s issues and roles including
prohibition; Progressive failures and successes; Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson
administrations’ response to Progressive movement

 

Activities:

1. PhotoStory – a visual illustration of the social problems of “industrialized” America (late
1800’s and early 1900’s photographs enhanced with music, Smile, Though Your Heart is
Aching) as an introduction to the unit.
2. Students analyze and interpret an excerpt from The Jungle using APPARTS.
3. Students research and role play as an assigned muckraker/progressive reformer (social,
economic or political problem(s) dealt with, goals to fix the problems, strategies the
reformer used, accomplishments). Role Play/Round Table discussion format is used.
4. Historiography: Students read Thomas C. Holt’s Emancipation, Race, and Ideology
(Conflict & Consensus, Vol. I, pp. 445-457) and primary source speeches of Booker T.
Washington and W.E.B. DuBois to prepare for discussion/debate over the opposing
views of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois (The Way We Lived, Vol. II, 117-
120).
5. Diagrams created comparing/contrasting Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson’s reform actions and
successes. Which would be considered the more radical reformer?
6. Evening movie: Iron Jawed Angels.

Assessments:

1. DBQ: Evaluate the effectiveness of Progressive Era reformers and the federal
government in bringing about reform at the national level. In your answer be sure to
analyze the successes and limitations of these efforts in the period 1900-1920.
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT TEN: Imperialism and World War I


 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 27, 30

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 21 (pp. 686-694), 23

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 by Alfred T. Mahan
b. White Man’s Burden by Rudyard Kipling
c. Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis by Reverend Josiah Strong
d. DeLome Letter
e. Over There by George M. Cohan
f. Four Minute Man Speeches
g. Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

America’s changing role in world affairs- from isolationism to imperialism; reasons for
new interests, sources of American expansionism; causes, events and results of Spanish-
American War; Filipino Insurgence; Open Door policies in China; Roosevelt Corollary
and Big Stick Diplomacy; Panama intervention and canal building; Taft’s Dollar
Diplomacy; Wilson’s Moral Diplomacy; causes and course of World War I; America’s
neutrality and entrance into and preparation for WWI; effects of war on home front;
Wilson’s 14 Points and the Treaty of Versailles; presidential and congressional roles in
policy management

 

Activities:

1. As individuals, students analyze and interpret primary and secondary source documents
about America’s move toward imperialism (Mahan’s The Influence of Sea Power Upon
History excerpt, Rudyard Kipling’s White Man’s Burden, 1890 census reporting the
closing of America’s frontier, yellow journalism articles about the burning sugar cane
fields in Cuba and “Butcher” Weyler’s reconcentration camps, America’s missionary
zealot Boswell Mathers quote about “saving the souls of heathens” along with Josiah
Strong’s Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis, DeLome letter excerpt,
Theodore Roosevelt as a War Hawk quote: “Nothing compares with the supreme
triumphs of war. . .”, Fergus McDaniel of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce quote: “We
cannot compete in such closed regions. Look at what happened in China.” and summary
about American need for new markets and raw materials, New York Journal’s pictures of
the U.S.S. Maine explosion in Havana Harbor). Students then categorize documents
(political, social, economic, intellectual, or religious – noting that some can be placed
into more than one category) and rank them according to significance in bringing about
imperialism and eventually war. Then students are placed in cooperative learning groups
to debate category placement and ranking. Groups share findings and a large group
discussion/debate ensues. This activity culminates in the unit DBQ.


2. PowerPoint lecture/discussion with pictures, paintings, maps, charts, graphs, short video
clips, political cartoons, and period music that provides relevant factual knowledge,
helping students analyze and interpret the causes, events and effects of World War I.
3. Students create a WWI propaganda poster.
4. Historiography: Woodrow Wilson, Realist of Idealist? (The American Pageant, pp. 718-
719) - read and discuss.

Assessments:

1. DBQ: Assess the impact of economic, political and social influence on America’s move
toward imperialism and the Spanish American Cuban War, 1870-1905.
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT ELEVEN: The Jazz Age and the Great Depression

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 32-34

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 24, 25, 26 (pp. 836-855)

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Weary Blues by Langston Hughes
b. America by Claude McKay
c. Yet Do I Marvel by Countee Cullen
d. Brother, Can You Spare a Dime by Yip Harburg and Jay Gorney
e. Happy Days are Here Again by M. Ager and J. Yellen
f. The Okies in California (The Way We Lived, Vol. II, pp. 199-200)
g. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
h. Dear Mrs. Roosevelt letters

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

Isolationism and foreign policy; Harding scandals; cultural conflicts: native vs. foreign,
rural vs. urban; the Red Scare; intolerance and immigration restrictions; religious
fundamentalism; prohibition and organized crime; economic boom with growth of a
mass-consumption economy, advertising and credit; automobile age; youth, flapper and
literary rebellion; Jazz culture, music and literature; agricultural problems, government
laissez-faire towards business; overproduction and high tariffs; stock market crash;
Americans society during the Great Depression; Hoover’s policies during Great
Depression, FDR’s New Deal legislation and programs; New Deal critics; New Deal
overturned and Court Packing Scheme; the Dust Bowl; political party realignment;
successes and failures of the New Deal

 

Activities:


1. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion with paintings, pictures, political cartoons, documents,
period music, and short video clips that provides relevant factual knowledge to help
students analyze and interpret the culture of the Jazz Age.
2. Cooperative learning groups visit stations set up in the classroom to experience cultural
aspects of the Jazz Age – reading primary source writings of Harlem Renaissance
authors; listening to jazz music of Louis Armstrong and other musicians (St. Louis Blues,
The Charleston, Ain’t Mibehavin’ and others); viewing art deco architecture built during
the 1920’s via the internet; viewing a portfolio of pictures and articles about flappers,
gangsters, and the Lost Generation; taking on roles of major players in the Scopes Trial
by reading an excerpt in play form of the movie, Inherit the Wind; and watching a video
excerpt on the Tulsa Race Riot - students create a response at each station to complete a
Jazz Age portfolio.
3. Students brainstorm and list causes of the Great Depression in a large group format and
then rank them in order from strongest to weakest factor in small cooperative learning
groups. Groups share finding and a large group discussion/debate follows. Conclude with
student suggestions as to what intervention could have slowed, halted or reversed the
Depression. (Adapted from Center for Learning’s AP U.S. History 2, Lesson 8)
4. Charts created explaining major legislation of the First and Second New Deal and
categorizing them as relief, recovery or reform (or multiples) and including major agency
leaders, as well as noting those ruled unconstitutional. Graphs created depicting change
over time from 1920-1942, in the areas of unemployment, bank failures, business
failures, farm prices, and industrial production, helping student evaluate the New Deal
(preparing students for the unit DBQ).
5. Evening Movie: Inherit the Wind, The Grapes of Wrath, or Cinderella Man.

Assessments:

1. FRQ: In what ways did economic conditions and developments in the arts and
entertainment help create the reputation of the 1920’s as the Roaring Twenties?
2. DBQ: Choose one
a. Analyze the responses of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration to the problems
of the Great Depression. How effective were these responses? How did they
change the role of the federal government? (1929-1941)
b. Compare/Contrast Hoover and FDR handling of the Great Depression

3. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT TWELVE: World War II and the Origins of the Cold War

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 34-36

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 26 (pp. 855-864), 27, 28 (Cold War sections)

 

Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. The Atlantic Charter
b. A Terrible Thing Had Been Unleashed by Philip Morrison (Ordinary Americans, pp. 210-
213)


c. The Damn Thing Probably Saved My Life by Ted Allenby (Ordinary Americans, p. 212)
d. Which One Might Have Been My Mother by Hideko Tamura Friedman (Ordinary
Americans, pp. 213-214)

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

causes and course of World War II; Holocaust; neutral America’s diplomatic solutions to
aid Allies; Pearl Harbor and U.S. entrance into war; home front preparation, Japanese
internment; U.S. military strategy in Europe and the Pacific; Atlantic Charter, wartime
conferences and the United Nations; Nuremberg Trials; division of Germany; Berlin
Blockade and Airlift; Truman Doctrine; Marshall Plan; NATO and Warsaw Pact; Korean
Conflict

 

Activities:

1. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion includes pictures, photographs, political cartoons,
posters, newspapers headlines and stories, charts, graphs, maps, short video clips, artwork
and period music which students are asked to interpret and analyze, helping them
synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical information about the causes, events
and effects of WWII and the Cold War.
2. Student view short documentary on Holocaust Survivor, Gerda Weissman Klein and Kurt
Klein, the American Jewish soldier who liberated her. Students read facts about the
United States response to the Holocaust, answer accountability questions, and respond in
a large group discussion. (Adapted from Center for Learning’s AP U.S. History 2, Lesson
16)
3. Inner/Outer Circle Discussion on the dropping of the atomic bombs (students are given
packets of primary and secondary source documents to read and prepare intuitive
questions to ask each other).
4. Students read Hiroshima by John Hersey; a round table discussion/debate follows over
whether the U.S. should or should not have dropped the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and
Nagasaki.
5. Political Cartoons created to illustrate a Cold Wart event, ideology, or theme.
6. Evening Movie: Life is Beautiful.

Assessments:

1. DBQ: What were the Cold War fears of the American people in the aftermath of the
Second World War? How successfully did the administration of President Dwight D.
Eisenhower address these fears, 1948-1961?
2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT THIRTEEN: Postwar Domestic Issues and Foreign Policy

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 37-40

The Enduring Vision, Chapters 28-32

 


Primary Source Readings/Excerpts (Students may be required to analyze some of these by
writing an APPARTS paper or through discussion):

a. Not a Second-Class Citizen by Ernest Green (Ordinary Americans, pp.226-228)
b. Ashamed to Be White (Ordinary Americans, pp.228-229)
c. Roe v. Wade (The Way We Lived, Vol. II, pp.303-305)
d. In Support of ERA, 1970 testimony of Gloria Steinem-Senate Subcommittee on
Constitutional Amendments (The Way We Lived, Vol. II, p. 229)

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes in the following topics/content areas:

Truman’s Fair Deal; GI Bill, postwar baby boom; Sunbelt and the suburbs; conformity
and rebellious youth of the 1950’s; prosperity and consumer culture of the 1950’s;
highway construction; McCarthyism; Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka; Warren
Court; Civil Rights Movement of the1950’s and 1960’s; War on Poverty and Great
Society programs; counterculture and anti-establishment movement of the 1960’s;
women’s liberation movement; arms and space race; Bay of Pigs incident; Cuban Missile
Crisis; Peace Corps; causes, course, and effects of the Viet Nam War; Nixon, détente, and
China; SALT talks and agreements; Watergate scandal and Nixon resignation; Camp
David Peace Accords; Panama Canal Treaties; Iran Revolution and hostage crisis;
Reagan and the end of the Cold War; Iran-Contra Scandal; Reaganomics

 

Activities:

1. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion includes pictures, political cartoons, charts, graphs, maps,
short video clips, artwork and period music which students are asked to interpret and
analyze, helping them synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical information
about the political, economic, social, cultural, intellectual and artistic development of
America, 1950-1980, with emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement.
2. Cooperative Learning Groups will prepare student newspapers about the Civil Rights
Movement.
3. PowerPoint Lecture/Discussion includes pictures, political cartoons, charts, graphs, maps,
short video clips, artwork and period music which students are asked to interpret and
analyze, helping them synthesize a significant amount of relevant historical information
about the causes, course and effects of the Viet Nam War.
4. PhotoStory: a visual and musical interpretation of the Stormy Sixties.
5. Students complete The Crimes of Watergate activity in the Center for Learning’s AP U.S.
History 2, Lesson 28.
6. Evening Movie: October Sky, Remember the Titans, or All the President’s Men.

Assessments:

1. FRQ: Choose one.
a. Discuss, with respect to TWO of the following, the view that the 1960’s
represented a period of profound cultural change: Education, Gender Roles,
Music, or Race Relations.


b. Analyze the extent to which TWO of the following transformed American society
in the 1960’s and 1970’s: The Civil Rights Movement, the Antiwar Movement, or
the Women’s Movement.

2. Unit Multiple Choice Exam

UNIT FOURTEEN: Americans Confront the Post-Cold War Era and Face a New Century

 

Textbook Readings:

The American Pageant, Chapters 41-42

The Enduring Vision, Chapter 33

Conflict & Consensus, Vol. 2, pp. 569-589

 

Themes/Topics/Content: This unit promotes and reflects the study of political institutions,
social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in U.S. History, with a focus
on relevant themes throughout the following topics/content areas:

Clinton’s administration, impeachment, and trial; Bush’s controversial election; terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and war in Afghanistan; dethroning Saddam Hussein and the
war in Iraq; immigration problems; American society and culture in the 21st century

 

Activities:

1. Cooperative learning groups choose major topics of the unit. Each group creates a DBQ
question and researches for 10 relevant documents that can be used as supporting
evidence. Students exchange DBQ packets and create essay outlines answering each of
the questions with outside evidence and document support. This is good preparation for
the approaching AP U.S. History exam.
2. Historiography: “Unity or Disunity - The Multicultural Debate” students analyze, discuss,
and compare The Disuniting of America by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. and Are We a
Nation? by Michael Lind (Conflict & Consensus, Vol. 2, pp. 569-589) in a
discussion/debate.

Assessments:

Unit Multiple Choice Exam

 

Post Exam Activity:

Major Research Project

Students in cooperative learning groups research an event which has had a major impact on
American history. They create a simulation or dramatic group presentation of the event.
Bibliography must be included.

 

OOLOGAH HIGH SCHOOL
Government

COURSE SYLLABUS

2014-2015

INSTRUCTOR: Mr. Luke Bennett


 

ROOM NUMBER:

357

PLANNING PERIOD:

8:00-9:00 AM

SCHOOL  PHONE:

918-443-6000

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

Luke.Bennett@oologah.k12.ok.us

PREREQUISITE(S):

None


 

 

  1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

 In this course, you will gain the knowledge you need to be an informed, contributing citizen. We will learn about the foundations of our government, and examine the documents that still govern our society today. We will learn about the different branches of our government: Executive, Legislative and Judicial, and the role that each one plays. We will also learn what effect public opinion and interest groups have on our government. We will learn the difference between state and local governments and how each one works for us. We will also examine the United States’ role in international politics.

 

     B. METHOD OF INSTRUCTION

     We will use many different methods of learning throughout the quarter in                   this class. The key element is participation! It is important that all students feel welcome and able to express their opinions and that everyone participates in class discussions and projects. In our study, we will use lecture, group discussion, group activities and presentations, debates, speakers, videos, outside readings, analyze documents, internet research, and much more!

 

Class discussions: Discussions of current events and other topics relevant to public policy will be regular occurrences in class. There will be natural differences of opinion that occur during discussions. Students MUST respect the discussion process and concede that people WILL disagree.

 

C. COURSE OBJECTIVES 

  1. Students will identify their roles in civic life, politics and government.
  2. Students will identify the foundations of the American political system.
  3. Students will understand how the government established by the Constitution embodies the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy.
  4. Students will understand the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs.
  5. Students will identify their roles in American democracy.
  6. Students will become familiar with current events at the local, state, national and international levels as they relate to government and how it functions.

 

 

D. COURSE TOPICS/UNITS AND DATES

 

Unit 1: Foundations of American Government

Objectives: the students will be able to identify the following

1.        the relationship between government and the state, theories on the origins of the state, political philosophies that influenced US government and the goals, as expressed in our founding documents

2.       different forms of government and how power is shared and/or distributed in each

3.       basic concepts of democracy in the United States

4.       origins of the American system of government

5.       the six basic principles embedded in the US Constitution and the formal and informal amendment process

6.       how federalism works in the United States and the relationship between states and the national government and interstate relationships

 

Unit 2: Political Behavior: Government By the People, Chapters 5-9

           Objectives: the students will be able to identify the following

  1. political parties, what they do and how they are organized
  2. party systems and how the two-party system has worked in        American history
  3. minor parties in the United States

4.       historical voting patterns and/or behaviors

5.       voter qualifications

6.       the role of the suffrage and civil rights movements in expanding voting rights in US history

7.       the electoral process from the nomination through election, including the role of money in the process

8.       the role of the mass media and public opinion in the electoral process

          9.       the role of interest groups in the political process

         

Unit 3: The Legislative Branch, Chapters 10-12

          Objectives: the students will be able to identify the following

          1.        the structure of the national legislature

          2.       qualifications for the House of Representatives and Senate

          3.       Congressional powers: expressed, implied and non-legislative

          4.       the committee process and how a bill becomes a law

        

Unit 4: The Executive Branch, Chapters 13-17

         Objectives: the students will be able to identify the following

         1.        presidential qualifications and the succession process

         2.       the nomination and electoral process

         3.       presidential powers and the growth in scope for the executive

         4.       the role of the federal bureaucracy: presidential advisors

          5.       how government is financed: tax and non-tax revenues

          6.      agencies responsible for administering policies

          7.       American foreign policy and the role of alliances

 E. TEXTBOOK(S) AND REQUIRED TOOLS OR SUPPLIES

  1. Pearson American Government
  2.  Spiral Notebook with pockets

 

F. GRADING PLAN

  1. Grades will be based on the Total Point system, with four grade categories. The Final Exam will be worth 20% of the semester grade.
    1. Test
    2. Daily Grade
    3. Essay
    4. Final

Note: Students with disabilities may require accommodations in your class. Accommodations for a Student with a Disability

If you require a disability-related accommodation please let me know as soon as possible so that I can assist you in a timely manner.

Cheating constitutes academic dishonesty and, in general will be handled as part of the course grading process. Penalty may range from no credit for the assignment up to and including exclusion and/or an “F” grade for the course.

 

K. WEEKLY OR DAILY PLANNED SCHEDULE (OPTIONAL)

Current events article summaries will be handed in every Friday.

 

 

 

 

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